Education

A few months ago, I watched a video of a young adult, Suli Breaks, titled “Why I Hate School But Love Education” in which he was performing an act of Spoken Word; which is an art that is word-based, often including collaborations or experimentation with other forms of art such as dance. The video was explaining that Suli had come to the realisation that education and school are not necessarily the same thing, despite having completed a University degree himself.

Suli quotes:

“Education is about inspiring ones mind not just filling their head” and take this from me, because I’m a educated man myself, who only came to this realisation after countless nights in the library with a can of Red Bull keeping me awake ’til dawn , another can in the morn, falling asleep in between paws of books which probably equates the same amount I’ve spent on my rent, memorise equations, facts and dates, write it down to the letter, half of which I’d never remember, and half of which I forget straight after the exam, and before the start of the next semester, asking anyone if they had notes for the last lecture? I often found myself running to class, just so I could find the spot on which I could rest my head and fall asleep without making a scene, ironic because that’s the only time I ever spent in university of chasing my dreams.
And then after nights with a dead-mind; identifying myself in the queue of half awake student zombies waiting to hand in an assignment, maybe that’s why they call it a dead line. And then after three years of mental suppression and frustration, my proud mother didn’t even turn up to my graduation.”
I found this extract of the video to be particularly powerful as I came to the realisation myself, that education and school are not the same.

Education is learning what is valuable to you as an individual depending on your personality, your interests, your dreams and goals. School is being taught to memorise irrelevant pieces of information, putting yourself under extreme pressure whilst juggling the struggles of meeting a coursework deadline, getting enough sleep in order to function adequately, ensuring that your own physical and mental health is okay, attempting to have some form of a social life in order to feel human and making time to making time to be with your family and loved ones.

As humans, our level of intellect is decided for us in the exact same manner that animals are – by how well we follow orders.

We are taught that we will only be successful in life if we pass the exams that are thrown at us. Who are taught by? Society. Including teachers, members of authority, parents, family, MP’s, Prime Ministers, Politicians and many more. Why? Because they were taught the exact same thing and know no different. Ask David Cameron when the last time he used the pythagorean theorem in Parliament and I’ll rest my case.
David Cameron did not wish to quality in the field of mathametics, for David Cameron’s goal and fate was within Politics. So if a students personal goal and strength is within the field of retail management or owning their own clothes stall in a hippie market somewhere far away from their hometown, why are they made to feel like they will amount to nothing if they don’t pass their Geography exam?

“Everybody is a genius. But, if you judge a fish by its ability to climb a tree, it will spend it’s whole life believing that it is stupid.” – Albert Einstein, one of the world’s most intellectually renown individuals, who was in fact, dyslexic.

Examiners are given a checklist of what is right and wrong; if a student is to think outside of the box and provide examiners with an answer that requires thought beyond the approved print of their checklist, the student fails. Teaching a generation that expanding their mind and thinking beyond the usual horizon is wrong is completely unhealthy.

What do you think? Share your thoughts and comments below.”

Thankyou for your time I look forward to hearing from you!

BY: Ayse Gurkan