Ordinary British people are struggling. With money, with job losses and with health and family issues. The failure of the left to provide efficient solutions means that people are turning to those who will …

 

The political left is weak, shattered and has little to no political direction. But in the midst of their ruins a worrying trend has taken place, the rise of the far right. They claim to give a political voice to the blue-collar workers that have been ignored by the main political parties and the left has failed to challenge their rhetoric. For the far right the enemy is simple, immigrants who are putting further strain on all public resources and increasing immigration from poorer European states thereby putting further strain on public services. People believe that British culture is being eroded by foreign influences, particularly the British people.

The far right argue that these fears are true and many in the public agree. Worse yet, no coherent alternative has been provided by the left, particularly Labour. They are squabbling amongst themselves as they believe that going into a general election with Jeremy Corbyn as their leader is electoral suicide. Moreover, simply engaging in the same arguments which say that immigrants are a benefit to the economy rather than a drain can no longer be justified by many that support these groups. They wish for concrete answers, they demand to know why their wages are stagnant or not increasing as much as those of others within the community; they wish to understand why their standard of living is deteriorating and why, when they become unemployed, their jobs are no longer available?

Public services remain under pressure, GP appointments are difficult to book, hospitals are busier than ever, and in this climate immigration is also increasing.

Undoubtedly, these people are looking for the cause of their hardship and the political parties are providing no answers. For instance, after the closure of the steel plant in Wales owned by Tata Steel, the Business Secretary, Sajid Javid, did not immediately return to implement a solution to the crisis. Labour has been active and is calling for renationalisation of the steel industry, however, even if nationalization occurs it will not solve the problem of low-skilled workers who have not been aided by the government to improve their skills in adapting to a more technologically advanced economy. Even if Tata Steel is overtaken by Liberty House or another company, some job losses will still occur despite Sanjeev Gupta, boss of Liberty House, insisting that this would be avoided.

The left has no solution and the deterioration between different ethnicities continues. A study shows that white pupils achieve worse results than children of immigrants. There has been a failure by government policy to address these problems. A lack of initiative exists in encouraging poorer white students to pursue further education or training and providing incentives for companies to retrain their workers so they are better suited for a changing workplace.

The resentment will continue until the government along with the left find a concrete solution, so groups within the UK will feel that they are not being ignored by the establishment.

It will remain easy to state that far right groups certainly do not represent the country; this may be true, but they do provide an alternative to the hardships faced by regular people.