‘She’s only been in the job 5 minutes’ … yes, but what a five minutes it has been!

 

Earlier in August, the new PM’s vacation to Switzerland caused an upset. Accusations circulated that she doesn’t understand the lack of leisure time available to the working class or the rarity of holidaying for many British families. One Twitter user even questioned how Mrs May could have the audacity to take a holiday only five weeks into her premiership, given the country’s turbulent times.

‘Interrupted’ during her vacation by quarrelling Brexit ministers

Well, it is precisely these turbulent times that absolutely grant Mrs May the right to a summer vacation. Yes, she may have only become PM on July 13 and holidayed just over a month later, but what a month it has been. Prematurely inheriting the reigns of a country fragmented like never before, setting up an almost entirely new Cabinet, debating with Merkel and Hollande, and also trying to settle the Brexit egos of her appointed ministers. If that doesn’t deserve a time-out for reflection, then what does?

‘She went to Switzerland to see what turmoil Brexit can actually set about’.

Parliament is on recess usually at a similar time to the school summer holidays, meaning Mrs May has a brief window off opportunity for a vacation, and she has every right to take it while she can. Since her holiday, the PM has found herself on rocky ground with regards to the Junior doctors issue (which condemns her ‘Thatcherite’ steeliness and refusal to budge). That aside, she is currently in China for her first appearance at the G20 summit since the fateful vote in June — a daunting task for anyone.

Those taking issue with Theresa May’s vacation must seriously consider the conditions of her work. She weathered what were arguably the most stressful five weeks of her life, and thus far hasn’t really put a foot wrong. So maybe her critics should save some of their venom for a more appropriate occasion.

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