The Supreme Court nominee’s reputation has been tarnished by serious allegations of sexual assault and misconduct by three different women. He has also been accused of lying under oath about stolen memos used by the Bush administration in the early 2000s. This should be reason enough to at the very least postpone the candidacy vote until these allegations have been investigated further.


Instead, this delicate case has turned into a mud-slinging match between the Republicans and the Democrats. Psychology professor Dr Christine Blasey Ford — who has raised the most serious allegation — has become a pawn in this political power struggle.

Republicans are pushing for the vote to still go ahead as planned, suggesting — ridiculously — that the accusations directed at Kavanaugh are part of a Democrat ‘search and destroy strategy’.

Even though there is no evidence to support nor disprove the allegations at this stage, the vote should be postponed until a full investigation has been carried out. It is astounding that the senate committee vote is still scheduled to go ahead as planned on Friday.

Ms Feinstein, the Democratic senator for California, has urged the vote to be delayed.

‘It is in the hands of the FBI to conduct an investigation. This should happen before the Senate moves forward on this nominee’.

It would prove disastrous if Kavanaugh was voted in as a Supreme Court Judge and then convicted of sexual assault. But aside from that, the American establishment needs to start taking rape allegations more seriously.

Dr Ford was incredibly brave to come forward. She has claimed that Kavanaugh pinned her to a bed and groped her while drunk, covering her mouth when she tried to scream as a friend watched on, before she was able to escape the room.

She has said it is her ‘civic duty’ to raise the issue, and she is absolutely right. The mere possibility that Mr Kavanaugh behaved in such a manner should make the Republicans realise that he is not fit to serve as a Supreme Court Judge.

Unsurprisingly, Mr Kavanaugh resolutely denied the allegations, telling the Senate judiciary committee:

‘I’ve never sexually assaulted anyone: not in high school, not in college, never’.

President Trump, as usual, has waded into the situation with a lack of sensitivity, serving only to exacerbate tensions. He praised Kavanaugh’s testimony, describing it as ‘honest’ and ‘powerful’.

What about Dr Ford’s powerful and honest testimony? What about her claim that she is ‘100 per cent’ sure the man who groped her and pinned her down in 1982 was Kavanaugh?

Ford has no reason to lie — it would have been incredibly tough for her to muster the courage to come forward at all. But Kavanaugh has a number of vested interests: a reputation to protect, a career on the line, ambitions. Of course he is going to deny the accusations.

It is her word against his, but it is clear whose side Mr Trump has picked.

And Dr Ford is not alone. Washington DC resident Julie Swetnick has claimed that on a number of occasions, Kavanaugh attempted to make her and others inebriated and disoriented so they could then be ‘gang-raped’ in a side-room or bedroom by a ‘train’ of ‘numerous boys’. Meanwhile, social volunteer Deborah Ramirez has accused Kavanaugh of exposing himself to her at a drunken dormitory party.

Dr Ford said she brought up the allegations to give senators a ‘fuller understanding’ of Kavanaugh’s character and history, and she is absolutely correct and justified to do so. Yes, this all took place three decades ago; but what it brings into question is the moral fibre of Mr Kavanaugh.