There have been many outcomes as a result of Theresa May’s 588-page draft of the Brexit EU Agreement. The most intense is the resignation of many key politicians who work on Brexit. As a result of this, there is increasing stress throughout the nation on whether more will follow in their footsteps. What is to happen with only 134 days left until the United Kingdom leaves the European Union?


Brexit Secretary David Raab is one of the key members who has been working towards Brexit, at least up until he resigned this morning following the release of this draft. In an interview with the BBC, Raab stated he believes that the way that the EU agreement is going is fatally flawed. He thinks that there are two significant flaws with the agreement that were presented to the Cabinet Office yesterday. Firstly, that ‘the terms being offered by the EU threatens the integrity of the United Kingdom’ and secondly that the U.K. would be locked in under the rules of the EU with no exit process.

While he says that in his absence someone who believes in the draft can take it through and improve it, his departure is still a shock to British politics. If this pattern continues it will lead to extreme issues in future Brexit negotiations and procedures. To me, this screams disaster. I respect and understand not wanting to work on something you don’t believe in, but why can’t politicians such as David Raab use their disapproval of the current agreement as motivation to work harder towards their ideal outcome for Britain?

Following the resignation of David Raab, there have been other significant resignations. These include, Northern Irish Minister Shailesh Vara, the Work and Pensions Secretary Esther McVey, and Parliamentary member Jacob Rees-Mogg. And most importantly, a vote of no confidence has been called for by Jacob Rees-Mogg and Sheryll Murray.

What is meant by this is that a formal motion in the House of Commons has been called, stating that the current PM, this being Theresa May, is no longer deemed fit to hold their position. Could this mean a possible Government collapse? What is to come of Theresa May and the EU agreement draft? All we know, for now, is that we are all kept on our toes and hoping for stability in British politics, but that does not necessarily mean giving up on the issues at hand. It is easier, yes, to pawn off the positions to other people, but that leads to even more delays and instability. I argue that if politicians keep leaving their positions and then try to remove the Prime Minister from power, it will not make the situation any better. There is no time for an election now. What must be done is to uphold the British Government and provide a Brexit that does the same.

After the hectic chaos that has made up the better part of today, with ministers resigning and calling publicly for a motion of no confidence, May’s press conference was almost calm in comparison. The PM stood strong throughout, reiterating that her Brexit deal was the best of both worlds; Britain leaving the EU, the trade Union and Custom’s Unions, whilst also protecting cross-boarder jobs, Northern Ireland’s boarders and families. It almost sounds like the deal could mean that Britain will not only get its cake, but eat it to. However, November is not over yet and the deal still needs to be brought before the EU and agreed in the House of Commons.

Although Brexit is not yet set in stone, when asked about the vote of no confidence Mrs May made it clear that she intends to stay and see the job through.